Trying things that don’t always work out

Hello my friends! And a very happy 2013 to you. I’m marching right into this year, full steam ahead.  I have two new knitting projects on the needles, and a stack of sewing projects I’d like to start.

In fact, I’ve already learned something about sewing this year: ideas that sounds brilliant in your head don’t always translate to a project the way you expect them to. And I’m having to remind myself that’s okay. I’ll share more soon but in the meantime I’ll give you a little taste. It involves that pretty fabric on the top of the stack below. It’ll be fine, just not exactly what I was picturing in my head.

I think the moral of the story is sometimes you just have to try something to know if it’ll work out. The best laid plans and all, right? This was an idea I had kicking around in my head for months, but now that I finally sat down to start it, it’s turning out to be more trouble than I think it’s worth. But I’m glad I tried it, and in the end I’ll have at least one coordinated outfit in my closet. Plus, if I’d never tried it I would have kept on planning and wasting brain space that can now be spent planning something else. Yahoo, right?

Have you learned any lessons when you tried something new in a project that didn’t quite work out?

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Golly, 13 Comments!

  • I have definitely had this issue. I always seem to have visions in my head and it is difficult to translate them, especially as I can’t draw. I think I need to take my time and think through the pattern, the fabric and the picture in my head. Normally my issue in the past has been poor fabric choice. I have learned to spend a little more to get the quality and drape that I am after.

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    • I couldn’t draw myself out of a paper bag! Ironic as my grandfather was a talented artist. That’s a good lesson about fabric. I know we’ve all made mistakes with selecting the wrong fabric at some point or another!

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  • Oh yes, my woefull knitting knowledge made me rip out a doggie sweater I’d had on the needles for over a year. I’ve learned that if I don’t know how to do something and can’t find the answer on Youtube or other knitting sites, *do not proceed until I learn how to do it* so that I don’t have to rip out the real project!

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  • I learning lessons like that all of the time. Just recently with a sewing project. I drafted the pattern myself so I had to figure out every step by myself. Tried some new tings. I thought I had everything covered and the muslin went well. While sewing the actual skirt I started doubting and changed things, but that led to even bigger problems. Ooh well, I guess it’s all about the learning process. I sewing a second version of the skirt now and this one is going much better!

    And I agree on the poor fabric choice BusyLizzie is mentioning.

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    • I’m glad the second one is working out better! I don’t always do muslins and sometimes it surprises me that things that work on muslins still don’t work on the real thing in the end! Especially if you tweak things, which I do too. :)

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  • Certainly, isn’t that how we learn? Sometimes it’s just small parts of a project, that can be altered and the project saved, sometimes the whole thing is really just a learning process. My latest make of that kind was my first jersey top, which I have only worn once. The second one I wear, but it’s far from perfect. So basically, can you wear it and it turned out ok but just different from your vision, then it’s still a well done project =)

    Love the fabrics! Really curious, and looking forward to seeing what they turned into =)

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  • This is such an import reminder, not only when sewing/crafting, but for life in general. I was a hardcore perfectionist as a child, but have striven to be less so as an adult, and one of the key steps in that process is not to be as afraid to try things, even if they don’t pan out how you’d envisioned. Lovely note to start 2013 off on, Tasha, thank you.

    ♥ Jessica

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  • What a relief to hear that it happens to other people (although that does sound as though I am wishing it on you – I am not!).
    I need to learn more patience as my ‘mistranslations’ often end up with me losing my temper or the will to live. And the material is thrown into the back of the wardrobe or, if wrecked in desperate attempts to get it to flippin’ well work, the bin.
    I’ve just recently discovered your blog, and now follow you on Instagram, as you are a sewing inspiration! You have inspired me to return to the scene of many sewing crimes and be more zen about things…
    JoBeanie75

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  • I’m sure it’s not as bad as you think! Though I do know just how you feel. One of my most recent sewing projects based on a 1940s bag pattern ended up being an EPIC disaster much to my disappointment. I laughed at myself (and then said a few choice words) and then laughed at myself again for being so …so newbie! Those vintage directions don’t mess around lol. I’m still looking forward to seeing what those glorious fabrics of yours turn into ;)

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    • I’m glad you can laugh at yourself! For some reason I really get bogged down with frustration in sewing in a way I don’t with knitting. I think in the end the skirt is going to be really cute, but for all the hours I spent working up a little something special for it, it kind of fell flat (both how it looks and then how long it took to make it happen). Today I can laugh at it a little bit, especially because last night I showed Mel who promptly told me I was crazy because it looked awesome. lol

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  • Nice fabrics!!! I really want to see what you manage to do with them…
    I’m planning to learn how to sew in 2013, Santa brought me a brand new sewing machine… but I will begin with some pillows or napkins, must find time in my busy schedule!

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  • Too many to mention….

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  • The fabrics are lovely!! I definitely learned some interesting things about adding too many details to a garment/sewing for body shape when I made a dress with a Cynthia Rowley pattern. It was a good lesson to learn, but I was (and still am) crazy sad about not having enough fabric to save it.

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