Fair isle beret & lace gloves for Fall

Fall! ‘Tis the season for knitters everywhere to enjoy their woolies!

I was determined to get a bit of accessory knitting in early for Fall, and diligently started back in August when I first got bitten by the Fall bug. My initial plans were for a matching fair isle beret and fingerless gloves from the book Vintage Knits by Sarah Dallas, as well as a pair of gloves from this free vintage pattern and a beret in the same yarn to make a matched set. I knit the lace gloves first, and wanted to knit the fair isle beret next to break up the type of knitting I was working on, but I had a suspicion that two sets of matching beret/gloves would be asking a bit much of my attention span when I had other knits on my mind, too. So I included the yarn used for the gloves in one of the motifs in the beret, thus giving me the opportunity to wear those together as a set!

First, the beret.

The beret is knit in a mix of yarns, from Shetland to cashmere merino hand-dyed. It was fun to knit, however there was an error in the pattern in the book that I had to correct before I started. The motif in the chart was incorrect compared to the sample knit in the book and the tiny picture of the original vintage (the patterns in the book are all based on vintage patterns). I was able to tell looking at the chart as the motif wasn’t mirrored, and just looking at it you could tell something was amiss. Fair isle is always well-balanced, and this obviously wasn’t. So I re-charted it and knit from my chart. The only other change I made was to knit the ribbing using about 15 less stitches than called for, since I wanted it to stay nice and tight. I just made up for the difference in the number of stitches I increased in the first row after the rib.

The gloves were easy to knit, except the fingers. I always avoid knitting fingers because they are a giant pain in the rear, but I knew I wanted these to be gloves so I did it anyway. In the end I’m glad I did, even though I think the fit could be a bit better between the hand and fingers. However there’s no way I would rip back 10 fingers to try and change that, so they’ll be enjoyed as they are. :)

The lace pattern was easy to knit and only had 4 rows to the pattern, but I charted it on paper because knitting lace by reading rows is a bit of a chore.

The cuff was quite interesting in the pattern. It uses a picot hem on the front of the wrist, and ribbing on the back to keep them nice and tight. I couldn’t quite envision how it would all work before I started knitting, so it was fun to see it take shape. Sometimes knitting can be like that, you don’t really know what will happen until you do it!

I also lengthened the cuffs quite a bit compared to the original pattern, as I particularly wanted to wear them with my green jacket which has sleeves that hit just above my wrist.

Truly it’s not quite cold enough to need gloves just yet so I only donned them for the photos, taken outside an interesting old apartment building in my neighborhood. But they do look swell together, I think!

Anyway, I’m quite pleased with both projects. While my head is spinning with other fun accessories, it’s time to get to some sweater knitting. A big batch of yarn arrived in the mail today and I’m so excited to get to it (hint: it’s for my Colorwork: 101 sweater)!

Are you knitting anything fun for Fall??

Filed: Knitting, Vintage Wardrobe

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Golly, 37 Comments!

  • I love the way these turned out. That’s one of my favorite shades of yellow and the colors you picked for the hat look perfect.

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  • so pretty! i love both the gloves and the beret :)

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  • Aw, fantastic!! LOVE the colours!

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  • Love! I think it’s a great idea to color coordinate the gloves and beret. Now whenever you get around to the other halves, you’ll have 4 pieces to mix and match. I’m currently working on a cabled neck warmer to match a pair of wrist warmers I just finished.

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  • Fabulous!! I really love the vibrant color scheme!

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  • Nice work! I am working on a tie neck jumper: Stitchcraft no.171, 1947 from Vintage Purls in red Lannet. I need to get on some mittens too as I lost two pairs last winter! I’m also pondering designing a harlequin colour stranded sweater…But currently I am healing from a pinched nerve in my neck so I am benched from knitting! Aeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee.

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  • Oh my god, I’m so envious of everything that is going on in this post. The color combinations are especially lovely.

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  • I WISH I could knit this well! I have no idea how the beret works! Lovely to be warm in such lovely colours! xoxo

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  • Fantastic! Every time I see your knitting results I wish I could do that,too :-)

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  • The gloves and beret are superb. I haven’t attempted fair isle yet, but after seeing your amazing work I think I’ll have to have a go!

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  • What a gorgeous set! I’m really loving the colours. Wish I wasn’t absolutely clueless when it comes to knitting – it would make fall wear a lot more fun.

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  • Beautiful bit of Fair Isle you have there, and those gloves! Smashing :)

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  • Your beret is just beautiful. I must add a fair isle beret to my ‘to knit’ list. The lace gloves are very pretty too – gloves and hat make a great set.
    I’m soldiering on with my fair isle jumper – one day soon I’ll get past the rib! :)

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  • I am impressed!

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  • Those gloves are stunning! I’ve never made gloves before but I might have to give this pattern a shot!

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  • Knitting fingers is totally the worst! I’ve made one pair of gloves and I’d like another, but oh, those fingers! Yours look awesome and the beret is fabulous.

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  • Must be hard to knitt such amazing gloves!!! Congratulations, it’s lovely!!!!

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  • The knitting, the out fit and you are all lovely!! :D

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  • I’ve had that beret and glove pattern on my list of ‘things to knit’ for years now. It’s one of the reasons why I bought that book, but I’ve been distracted. Yours are simply lovely :)

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  • That does it–I need to order some yarn soon and stop waffling over potential knitting projects! hehe (Problem is, I can’t make up my mind–pretty much my whole Ravelry queue is appealing to me at the moment. ;)

    Both pieces turned out lovely! I’m especially loving the sunny hue of the gloves. Quick question: do you have any tips for knitting fingers on gloves? I’ve knit a few (partial-finger for fingerless mitts) before, and always struggled.

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  • Thank you, everyone!! ♥

    @Moira Your project sounds great, and a harlequin sweater, what fun! I hope you heal soon, injuries that impair knitting are a drag!

    @Casey My queue is like that, too! LOL I think one of the trickiest things about fingers is picking up the stitches at the base of the previous finger, especially as it’s easy to get little gaps there. I picked up an extra 2 than the pattern called for, one at the front of the hand and one at the back, then decreased them away in the first row. That pretty much does away with gaps! I also find the fingers themselves fiddly and they get in the way, so once I start the next finger I either tuck the previous one to the inside if I find it’s flapping around and getting in the way, or pin it to the hand with a safety pin or closing stitch marker. But no matter how you cut it, fingers really ARE a bit of a struggle, I think!

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  • They both look great! I’ve done two gloves in the past and that’s all I’ll ever do; I definitely agree that knitting fingers is a serious pain.

    I’m finishing up a vintage lace sweater right now. All I have left are the sleeves. So close, so close.

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  • The hat and gloves look amazing and you look so pretty modeling them!!!
    Your tension is so even with all of that colorwork on the beret; I seriously can’t wait till you pass off some of your mad skills in your colorwork-tutorials.

    I may need to knit up these gloves for myself… once I finish my gloves from last year. (I did a few fingers by winging-it since the instructions weren’t all that helpful, but it’s been sitting ever.)

    I seriously think you knit faster than I sew! :) Can’t wait to see your next FO.

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  • AHHGGG! I LOVE these so much! We must have the same taste because I totally want all your knitwear :) hehehehhe

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  • Oh such a wonderful, jaunty beret for fall! LOVE the colors, and even though they do nothing for keeping one’s head warm, berets are by far my favorite hats.

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  • Love this set! Those gloves seem like something that would quickly become a staple…
    I’ve got 2 cowichans in the works currently. I’m in the midst of a cowichan knitting obsession – they’re so fun and quick!

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  • These are amazing! You have such skills. And that first photo totally looks out of an old Vogue magazine :)

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  • I think I already said how much I love the beret, and the gloves in yellow are so fun!

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  • You do such an amazing job.Those gloves are so cool.It reminds me of mustard yellow wich I love.The pattern on the beret is amazing.how ever do you do it?x

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  • Wow these are really gorgeous! I’m so impressed by your hat especially, I’m total rubbish at knitting with different colours, need to sit down with my mum and learn it properly! :)

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  • Oh My God! How jealous am I of those gloves and that berret! want want want!

    They are gorgeous, hope you’re proud? Wish I could knit this well.

    looking forward to future projects :)

    Much Love

    Emma
    xxx

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  • I am very impressed with your knitting skills. You have the patience of a saint!! They look so complex, well done you :)

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  • i adore those gloves!!! they look beautiful.

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  • So vintage…we feel like to be in 1940

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  • So beautifull – I love your style very much.

    Many greatings from germany.

    Anupa

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  • […] link) is technically from the 50s, they’re a classic addition to a 40s wardrobe, too.  I knit them myself a few of years ago–it’s a great […]

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